Royal Caribbean Ships by Size, Age and Class (2022)

Royal Caribbean's Wonder of the Seas

Royal Caribbean has an active fleet of 26 ships currently. They plan to launch a further 4 more ships between 2022 and 2026 (Icon on of the Seas, Utopia of the Seas and two unnamed currently) which will bring them to 30 ships and keep their position as the largest cruise line fleet in the world.

Introduction to Royal Caribbean

Royal Caribbean is an American cruise line headquartered in Miami, Florida. It was founded in 1968 in Norway by three Norwegian shipping companies and the first ship to sail for the company was Song of Norway in 1970.

Later on, the company merged with the greek cruise line Celebrity Cruises but kept the brand alive whilst also running Royal Caribbean. A further acquisition in 2018 of Silversea Cruises added another brand to the company, aimed at luxury cruise travellers.

Royal Caribbean is seen as one of the most innovative cruise lines in the world with many ‘firsts’ at sea (surfing, rock climbing, aqua theatre, world’s biggest ship and more) – they are very popular for all age groups and cater massively for families.

Their fleet of ships sails from dedicated ports around the world year-round and additionally they own two private islands which are visited by most of their Florida-based cruise ships.

This guide will help you work out which Royal Caribbean ship is which!

Royal Caribbean Ships Frequently Asked Questions

Royal Caribbean Ships by Size (from largest to smallest)

Ship NameTonnage (GRT)Passengers (Max)Length (Metres)Decks
Wonder of the Seas236,8576,98836218
Symphony of the Seas228,0816,68036218
Harmony of the Seas226,9637,20936218
Oasis of the Seas226,8386,77136218
Allure of the Seas225,2826,78036218
Spectrum of the Seas169,3795,62234716
Ovation of the Seas168,6664,90534716
Anthem of the Seas168,6664,90534816
Quantum of the Seas168,6664,90534816
Odyssey of the Seas167,7045,51034716
Freedom of the Seas156,2714,63533915
Liberty of the Seas155,8894,96033915
Independence of the Seas155,8894,56033915
Navigator of the Seas139,9993,97031115
Mariner of the Seas139,8634,00031115
Voyager of the Seas138,1944,00031115
Explorer of the Seas137,3084,29031115
Adventure of the Seas137,2763,80731115
Jewel of the Seas90,0902,70229313
Serenade of the Seas90,0902,70229313
Radiance of the Seas90,0902,46629313
Brilliance of the Seas90,0902,54329313
Enchantment of the Seas82,9102,73030112
Rhapsody of the Seas78,4912,41627912
Vision of the Seas78,3402,51427912
Grandeur of the Seas74,1362,44027912

What does ‘Tonnage (GRT)’ mean?

GRT (Gross Registered Tonnage) is a term used to calculate the volume inside a ship. It is a measure of cubic capacity and is calculated by the total volume from inside the hull and decks of the ship. 1 GRT = 100 cubic feet of space. In essence, the bigger the GRT – the more ‘space’ the ship has for passengers, cargo, etc.

How are ‘Passengers (Max)’ calculated?

You’ll see multiple numbers for passengers on ships – this is because many ships include extra beds in cabins (such as the sofa/couch can convert to a pull-out bed) – but the majority of cabins usually have 2 people in them. the ‘Max’ number is if every cabin used their additional pull-out bed, etc. This number is unlikely to be reached very frequently.

Royal Caribbean Ships by Age (from newest to oldest)

Ship NameBuilt
Utopia of the SeasDue 2024
Icon of the SeasDue 2023
Wonder of the Seas2022
Odyssey of the Seas2021
Spectrum of the Seas2019
Symphony of the Seas2018
Harmony of the Seas2016
Ovation of the Seas2016
Anthem of the Seas2015
Quantum of the Seas2014
Allure of the Seas2010
Oasis of the Seas2009
Independence of the Seas2008
Liberty of the Seas2007
Freedom of the Seas2006
Jewel of the Seas2004
Mariner of the Seas2003
Serenade of the Seas2003
Navigator of the Seas2002
Brilliance of the Seas2002
Adventure of the Seas2001
Radiance of the Seas2001
Voyager of the Seas1999
Explorer of the Seas2000
Vision of the Seas1998
Enchantment of the Seas1997
Rhapsody of the Seas1997
Grandeur of the Seas1996

Are all Royal Caribbean ships new builds?

Yes, all ships in the Royal Caribbean fleet have been built specifically for them. Some of their ships have at times been earmarked for transfer to other brands (Grandeur of the Seas was due to move to Pullmantur, but was cancelled)

Royal Caribbean Ships by Class (from newest to oldest)

Ship NameClass
Utopia of the SeasOasis class
Wonder of the SeasOasis class
Symphony of the SeasOasis class
Harmony of the SeasOasis class
Allure of the SeasOasis class
Oasis of the SeasOasis class
Icon of the SeasIcon class
Odyssey of the SeasQuantum-Ultra class
Spectrum of the SeasQuantum-Ultra class
Ovation of the SeasQuantum class
Anthem of the SeasQuantum class
Quantum of the SeasQuantum class
Independence of the SeasFreedom class
Liberty of the SeasFreedom class
Freedom of the SeasFreedom class
Jewel of the SeasRadiance class
Serenade of the SeasRadiance class
Brilliance of the SeasRadiance class
Radiance of the SeasRadiance class
Mariner of the SeasVoyager class
Navigator of the SeasVoyager class
Adventure of the SeasVoyager class
Explorer of the SeasVoyager class
Voyager of the SeasVoyager class
Vision of the SeasVision class
Enchantment of the SeasVision class
Rhapsody of the SeasVision class
Grandeur of the SeasVision class

What is the difference between the Oasis-class ships?

There are currently five Oasis-class ships and the sixth one is on order (Utopia of the Seas) – there are differences between each ship, although structurally they are all the same class of ship.

The first two ships are near-enough identical sisters, however, Harmony of the Seas and Symphony of the Seas both added the Ultimate Abyss – the world’s longest slide at sea.

The fifth ship, Wonder of the Seas added an eighth neighborhood ‘Suite Neighborhood’, a new restaurant ‘The Mason Jar’ and a new bar ‘ Vue’.

Final Thoughts

Royal Caribbean makes it easy for choosing a cruise ship to sail on – they have ships of varying different sizes and capacities – allowing them to sail from multiple ports around the world year-round.

Whilst their most-popular cruises leave from Miami, allowing calls at their private islands, many people enjoy Royal Caribbean sailing in Europe (to the Canaries and the Norwegian Fjords) and also in Asia, where Royal Caribbean has experimented with homeporting ships for the Chinese market in the past.

Oasis-class ships still get the most reviews (they of course also take the most passengers) but also because of more facilities and thus activities onboard.

That said, the Quantum-class ships are extremely popular with many delighted by the ‘North Star‘ attraction on the top of each Quantum-class ship.

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